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Tech Support

We understand that installing braking systems or converting your existing braking system is not always easy. Every some of the most experienced mechanics can get overwhelmed when it comes to power booster brakes or disc brake conversions — and your brakes are definitely a part of your car that you need to be functioning perfectly.

That is why we provide FREE tech support with your order! Give us a call and we will be happy to help you figure out what is going on with your braking system. We usually return tech calls at the end of the day and help every customer within 3 business days. If you can't wait for our support team, check out the resources below and see if you can diagnose the problem yourself or be able to give the tech more information about your setup.

  

 

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Other Helpful Resources

1. Brake Booster Test

2
Brake Pedal Diagnostics

3. How To Diagnose Your Issue

4. Master Cylinde FAQ

5. Disc Brake FAQ

6. How Does A Brake Booster Work & Tech

7. What Master Cylider Do I Need?

 

 

Typical Brake Setups

Figuring out how to plumb your brake system is quite simple. The two qualifying questions are:

1)  Is your brake system: Disc/Disc, Disc/Drum, or Drum/Drum?  Because...

  • Drum brakes require a 10 lb. residual pressure (RPV10) to counteract the spring tension in the drum system which tends to pull the shoes away from the drums.
  • Disc Brakes require a combination valve (often called a proportioning valve) and sometimes a 2 lb. residual valve- depending on where your master cylinder is relative to your calipers (see next bullet).

2)  For disc applications; Is your Master Cylinder mounted above or below your calipers? because...

  • If your master cylinder is below your calipers then a 2 lb. residual valve (RPV2) is needed to prevent fluid from flowing back from the calipers into the master cylinder.

Quick Reference Sheet:

DRUM BRAKES FRONT AND REAR WITH MASTER ON FIREWALL OR UNDER FLOOR
  • drum/drum, firewall or under floor

Drum brakes require a 10 lb. residual pressure (RPV10) to counteract the spring tension in the drum system which tends to pull the shoes away from the drums. This will give you a longer pedal travel and "spongy" brakes. The residual valve holds a pressure keeping the shoes near the drums giving a higher firmer pedal. Also required a metering valve (PVM) to the front (the metering valve prevents nose dive).


DISC BRAKES FRONT AND DRUMS REAR WITH MASTER ON FIREWALL
  • disc/drum, firewall

A disc/drum combination valve (PV2) is the easiest way to properly balance your braking system. The combination valve is two valves in one. It provides metering to the front which prevents nose dive and proportioning to the rear which prevents rear wheel lock up. We also recommend the addition of a 10 lb residual valve (RPV10) to the rear drum brakes.


DISC BRAKES FRONT AND DRUMS REAR WITH MASTER UNDER FLOOR
  • disc/drum, under floor

The best way to plumb a disc/drum system when the master is under the floor is with a combination valve (PV2) and then a 2 pound residual valve (RPV2) to the front which is needed to prevent fluid from flowing back from the calipers into the master. We also recommend the addition of a 10 lb residual valve (RPV10) to the rear drum brakes.

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DISC BRAKES FRONT AND DISCS REAR WITH MASTER ON FIREWALL
  • disc/disc, fire wall

The best way to plumb a disc/disc system when the master is on the firewall is with a four wheel disc brake combination valve (PV4).


DISC BRAKES FRONT AND DISCS REAR WITH MASTER UNDER FLOOR
  • disc/disc, under floor

The best way to plumb a disc/disc system when the master is under the firewall is with a four wheel disc brake combination valve (PV4) and a two pound residual valve (RPV2) to the front and a two pound residual valve (RPV2) to the rear.